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  • Futures thinking is used by governments to consider long-term strategic approaches and develop policies and practices that are potentially resilient to future uncertainty. English in Action (EIA), arguably the world's largest English language teacher professional development (TPD) project, used futures thinking to author possible, probable and preferable future scenarios to solve the project's greatest technological challenge: how to deliver audio-visual TPD materials and hundreds of classroom audio resources to 75,000 teachers by 2017. Authoring future scenarios and engaging in possibility thinking (PT) provided us with a taxonomy of question-posing and question-responding that assisted the project team in being creative. This process informed the successful pilot testing of a mobile-phone-based technology kit to deliver TPD resources within an open distance learning (ODL) platform. Taking the risk and having the foresight to trial mobile phones in remote rural areas with teachers and students led to unforeseen innovation. As a result, EIA is currently using a mobile-phone-based technology kit with 12,500 teachers to improve the English language proficiency of 700,000 students. As the project scales up in its third and final phase, we are using the new technology kit — known as the 'trainer in your pocket' — to foster a 'quiet revolution' in the provision of professional development for teachers at scale to an additional 67,500 teachers and nearly 10 million students.

  • Cloud computing is becoming a leading trend worldwide, due to its enhanced reliability, scalability, flexibility, availability and processing throughput. However, the decision related to adoption of the cloud computing model is often complicated by challenges and uncertainties about the expected business value and its overall impact on the organisation. Till date, different contemporary technology acceptance theories and models have been used to test and validate adoption chances of cloud computing at organisational and individual levels. However, no experimental study has been conducted to provide a holistic evaluation of the determinants of cloud computing in the Asian world particularly in the context of the Indian school education system. Due to lack of such studies, we propose a theoretical model based on the TOE framework to explain the role of technological, organisational and environmental factors on the adoption of cloud computing in the Indian school education system. The data was collected from fifty-six 56 randomly selected secondary schools through questionnaire based survey to examine the relationship between the variables employing 5-points Likert scale. Reliability and validity measures were used to establish the quality and the usefulness of the collected data. In addition multi co-linearity test was also conducted. In order to test the research hypothesis, multiple regression analysis was conducted. The results indicate that relative advantage, compatibility, and complexity representing technological factors; top management support representing organisational factors; and competitive pressure, external expertise and attitude towards change representing environmental factors were found to have an positive and significant influence on the adoption of cloud computing services in the Indian school education system. The findings have a great significance since they can provide knowledge about cloud computing factors as well as insights and directions to the education policy planners and decision makers for successful adoption of cloud computing technology in India.

  • This article presents an analysis of key developments in educational policies and strategies, since 2000, in relation to the education of children with disabilities in India and Pakistan. It responds to a set of specific questions focused on factors that have shaped the increased emphasis on education of children with disabilities, how national policies and programmes respond to their needs, and their current educational status. The article draws on analysis of official policies, various programme documents, and empirical research evidence. It concludes by reflecting on the two main foci for future work in relation to the education of children with disabilities.

  • This paper reviews the themes emerging from Bangladeshi teachers’ experiences of taking part in the initial research and the development stage of a professional development programme they were involved with. The Secondary Teaching and Learning Programme is an information and communications technologies‐enhanced supported open distance learning programme of professional development in English‐language teaching. This paper presents evidence arising from semi‐structured interviews carried out with teachers from a pre‐pilot study for the English in Action project. The teachers participating in this study reflect upon six months’ experience of using professional development materials (course material of audio podcasts enhanced with text and images; videos of classroom practice; audio of classroom language) and classroom resources (audio recordings of text‐book reading passages, songs, poems and stories), all accessed via portable digital media players (iPods).

  • Recent educational policy in India has repositioned elementary school teachers as active, reflective practitioners, not just ‘deliverers’ of syllabus material. This article examines innovations in teacher support in Rajasthan's government schools through the ‘Quality Education Program.’ Drawing on qualitative research of collaborative learning processes, the paper discusses two support strategies used by the program: professional dialogic interactions and modeling of pedagogic strategies, which paralleled introductory or developmental phases within a ‘collaborative apprenticeship model’ of teacher professional development. In doing so, the paper outlines the potential of situated, collaborative approaches for Indian in-service teacher education and education development reform, more broadly.

  • This research explores the deployment of model lessons through digital video as part of an in-service effort to engage teachers in government and private rural Indian schools and non-formal educational settings. Our mixed method design combined tests of skills in English and math with participant observation and videotaping of English and math instruction for 100 children in 3 rural schools and 1 non-formal setting over eight months. In this paper we present analyses of test score data and interactional patterns, followed by a qualitative examination of how one teacher appropriated pedagogical and subject matter knowledge from the model video lessons. Specifically, the data show gains in test scores of subject matter knowledge; children in classes that were part of the intervention scored almost 400% higher in English and almost 300% higher in math than did children in a comparison school. There were changes as well in classroom interactional patterns, suggesting that teachers became more student-centered in their approaches. The qualitative data illustrate how one teacher used and learned from the model lessons over time—for example, acquiring pedagogical strategies for interacting with the children and learning to connect classroom topics to the children’s local social worlds. Most generally, the data demonstrate how a network of teachers, schools, computer professionals, and teacher educators can reconfigure flows of information, tools, people, and texts, creating a band of geospatial opportunity within which the educational and social spaces of inhabitants of remote villages can be improved, allowing them hopeful entry to some of the advantages of a digital information age.

  • This research explores the deployment of model lessons through digital video as part of an in-service effort to engage teachers in government and private rural Indian schools and non-formal educational settings. Our mixed method design combined tests of skills in English and math with participant observation and videotaping of English and math instruction for 100 children in 3 rural schools and 1 non-formal setting over eight months. In this paper we present analyses of test score data and interactional patterns, followed by a qualitative examination of how one teacher appropriated pedagogical and subject matter knowledge from the model video lessons. Specifically, the data show gains in test scores of subject matter knowledge; children in classes that were part of the intervention scored almost 400% higher in English and almost 300% higher in math than did children in a comparison school. There were changes as well in classroom interactional patterns, suggesting that teachers became more student-centered in their approaches. The qualitative data illustrate how one teacher used and learned from the model lessons over time—for example, acquiring pedagogical strategies for interacting with the children and learning to connect classroom topics to the children’s local social worlds. Most generally, the data demonstrate how a network of teachers, schools, computer professionals, and teacher educators can reconfigure flows of information, tools, people, and texts, creating a band of geospatial opportunity within which the educational and social spaces of inhabitants of remote villages can be improved, allowing them hopeful entry to some of the advantages of a digital information age.

  • Background Gender-related norms and poverty remain important structural barriers to secondary school attendance among adolescent girls in southern India. We analyse how gender norms interact with family deprivation and dynamics to result in girls dropping out of school; we identify the main facilitators of school retention and changes to gender socialisation. Methods Longitudinal qualitative case studies with 36 girls were nested within a cluster randomized trial to evaluate the Samata intervention targeting adolescent girls in Bagalkote and Vijayapura districts in northern Karnataka. We used two rounds of in-depth interviews, conducted in 2014 at a time when respondents were in 8th standard at the age of 13 to 14 and sixteen months later. We combined thematic and narrative analyses. Results Our study found that poverty and socioeconomic realities at the household level strongly affect conformity with discriminatory gender practices such as restricting girls’ mobility. The value placed on education by parents clearly differentiates the regular school goers from those frequently absent and others who dropped out. With active encouragement of the girls’ educational and career aspirations, parents engendered the girl’s agency to communicate openly both at home and at school, allowing subtle changes to gender performance while resisting the pressure of social sanctions. In contrast, where educational aspirations were weak, parents invested more intensely in enforcing correct performance of gender, prioritising her well-being by aiming to secure her future in a good marriage. Among poorer families, girls’ domestic duties came at the cost of schooling with concerns about protecting her sexual purity predominating. Conclusions In contexts where a strong gender ideology of virginity before marriage rules, subtle shifts in harmful gender practices are possible. Interventions aiming to improve education need to target the most deprived families, focussing on trust building through open communication.

  • Discusses India's Special Orientation Programme for Primary School Teachers (SOPT), a new technology used to train large numbers of teachers so that the losses in transmission inherent in the "cascade model" are avoided. Responses from teachers and trainers show there is considerable potential for the exploitation of this technology. Contains 20 references. (VWC)

  • Purpose The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an Inclusive Digital Literacy Framework for vulnerable populations in rural areas under the Digital India program. Key challenges include addressing multiple literacies such as health literacy, financial literacy and eSafety for low-literate learners in low-resource settings with low internet bandwidth, lack of ICT facilities and intermittent electricity. Design/methodology/approach This research implemented an educational model based on the proposed framework to train over 1,000 indigenous people using an integrated curriculum for digital literacies at remote settlements. The model uses mobile technology adapted for remote areas, context enabled curriculum, along with flexible learning schedules. Findings The education model exemplifies a viable strategy to overcome persistent challenges by taking tablet-based digital literacies directly to communities. It engages different actors such as existing civil societies, schools and government organizations to provide digital literacy and awareness thereby improving both digital and life skills. It demonstrates the potential value of a comprehensive Digital Literacy framework as a powerful lever for Digital Inclusion. Practical Implications Policy makers can use this transformational model to extend the reach and effectiveness of Digital Inclusion through the last mile enhancing existing training and service centers that offer the traditional model of Digital Literacy Education. Originality/value This innovative mobile learning model based on the proposed Digital Framework for Inclusion instilled motivation, interest and confidence while providing effective digital training and conducting exams directly in the tribal settlements for low-literate learners in remote settings. Through incorporating multiple literacies, this model serves to empower learners, enhance potential, improve well-being and reduce the risk of exploitation.

Last update from database: 17/01/2021, 18:47 (UTC)